Post on LinkedIn by Pablo Rodas-Martini Author and speaker, bewitched by ships and ports, passionate for the decarbonization of the maritime industry, always trusting in science, and with a firm grasp of maritime and port economics.

A thought on climate change: ships won’t be able to hide their emissions anymore. Their emissions of SOx, NOx, PM, and CO2 will be tracked at all times in the near future. Between sniffer drones, planes equipped with sniffers, stationary sensors, and, on the deep-sea, satellites, shipping companies will be forced to reveal the full extent of their emissions—no more greenwashing by many of them on their sustainability reports! Read here an article from Yale Environment 360 about the critical role of satellites.

“Tracing emissions to their source is no easy task, however. Releases are often intermittent and easy to miss. Ground-based sensors can detect leaks in local areas, but their coverage is limited. Airplane and drone surveys are time-intensive and costly, and air access is restricted over much of the world. That’s where a crop of recently launched and upcoming satellites with increasingly sophisticated tools comes in.”

“A cluster of satellites launched by national space agencies and private companies over the last five years have greatly sharpened our view of what methane is being leaked from where. In the next couple of years, new satellite projects are headed for launch — including Carbon Mapper, a public-private partnership in California, and MethaneSAT, a subsidiary of the Environmental Defense Fund — that will help fill in the picture with unprecedented range and detail. These efforts, experts say, will be crucial not just for spotting leaks but also developing regulations and guiding enforcement — both of which are sorely lacking.”