Trump view on IMO 2020 not shared by Big Oil

Trump view on IMO 2020 not shared by Big Oil

The US oil industry is letting the Trump administration know about the billions of dollars in investments it has poured into the sector over the past decade to deliver compliant marine fuels to the shipping industry.

And since the industry is likely to benefit from the change, oil executives have not favoured the White House ‘experience building’ policy move on lowering the sulfur cup on bunker fuel which comes into force on January 1, 2020.

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Everything you need to know about MEPC 73

Everything you need to know about MEPC 73

Lloyd’s Register and the International Bunker Industry (IBIA) have both released excellent summaries of the key bunker-related issues addressed at 73rd session of IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC73).

While the immediate headlines were made by the adoption of the fuel oil carriage ban and rejection of an “experience building phase” (EBP) at the start of IMO 2020, several other critical items were up for discussion.

Those included important considerations for IMO 2020, such as the guidance of fuel quality, as well as steps to progress Shipping’s IMO2030 and IMO2050 GHG targets.

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IMO 2020 will benefit world fuel services: Kasbar

IMO 2020 will benefit world fuel services: Kasbar

World Fuel Services Corporation (WFS) Charmain and CEO, Michael J. Kasbar, believes his company will benefit from the upcoming IMO 2020 rule.

The global 0.50% sulfur cap on marine fuel that comes into force from January 1, 2020 will mean most vessels switching to low sulfur distillates for compliance.

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IMO looks set to introduce ban on ships carrying high-sulphur fuel

IMO looks set to introduce ban on ships carrying high-sulphur fuel

On 25 October The International Maritime Organization (IMO) will decide whether to ban the carriage of high-sulphur fuels, The Loadstar has learned.

Amendments to Marpol Annex VI were approved in April, during the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 72), and would prohibit the carriage of  fuels that don’t comply with the IMO’s 2020 low-sulphur regulations.

The amendments are expected to be formally implemented at this week’s MEPC 73.

In effect, this means any vessel carrying high-sulphur fuel oil (HSFO), such as the heavy fuel oil (HFO) containerships commonly burn, in special environmental zones would be considered to have breached the 2020 regulations.

A source told The Loadstar this would mean vessels would not be permitted to carry HSFO unless equipped with scrubber technology.

Trident Alliance chairman Roger Strevens told The Loadstar this would be a major step forward for health, environmental and fair competition interests.

It would make a powerful enforcement tool and send a clear signal of IMO’s commitment to the full implementation of the 2020 global 0.5% sulphur cap.

“The carriage ban strengthens the hand of enforcement because they would not have the burden of having to prove where or when a non-compliant fuel had been used,” said Mr Strevens. “Just the fact of the fuel being on the ship could be sufficient grounds to establish a breach had occurred.”

According to the International Bunker Industry Association (Ibia), a decision to adopt would mean the carriage ban would take effect on 1 March 2020, two months after the new regulations.

“A number of countries argued for deferring the carriage ban, due to uncertainty about the availability of compliant fuels and concerns about safety of the fuels on offer,” said Ibia.

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Bunker supplier licensing scheme mooted

Bunker supplier licensing scheme mooted

Licences for bunker suppliers might improve fuel quality as the shipping industry deals with the lower 0.5% sulfur content of fuel oil from the start of 2020, shipowners have suggested.

The proposal goes a step further than the required register of bunker suppliers that International Maritime Organisation (IMO) member states should maintain.

“Fuel oil fuel quality could be improved and the safety risks associated with poor quality fuel oil mitigated if member states implemented fuel oil supplier licensing schemes,” the shipowners said in a proposal to the IMO’s maritime safety committee as reported by maritime news provider Lloyd’s List.

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